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The Sandwich Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) is a sensitive and robust method which measures the antigen concentration in an unknown sample. The antigen of interest is quantified between two layers of antibodies: the capture and the detection antibody. These antibodies must bind to non-overlapping epitopes on the antigen. Either monoclonal or affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies can be used as capture and detection antibodies, depending on cost, the dynamic range and the sensitivity of the final assay.
  • Adenovirus Antigen Capture ELISA

    The Adenovirus ELISA is an in vitro procedure for the qualitative determination of adenovirus antigen in feces. It is a double antibody (sandwich) ELISA using a monoclonal anti-adenovirus antibody to capture the antigen from the stool supernatant. A second anti-adenovirus monoclonal antibody is then added, which binds to the complex. This reaction is visualized by the addition of anti-mouse antibodies conjugated to peroxidase. The resulting blue color, following the addition of the chromogen and peroxide, indicates the presence of adenovirus antigens being bound by the anti-adenovirus antibodies.

  • Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) Antigen Capture ELISA

    The advent of biological products produced using animal components has created a need to ensure their removal prior to use. This removal can be accomplished in a number of ways but in all cases, must be verified by the use of a sensitive and specific assay methodology. Fetal calf serum is commonly used in tissue culture processes in concentrations of 1 – 10%. Guidelines published by a 1987 WHO study group (WHO Tech. Rep. Ser., 747, 1987) suggest a residual concentration of no more than 1 part per million in the final product (1 µg/ml).

  • Chicken IgY Antigen Capture ELISA

    Because of the high concentration of IgY found in egg yolks, eggs are a convenient and safe source of antibodies for study and to demonstrate the power off the ELISA technique. Virusys has developed an easy to use ELISA that permits the sensitive detection and quantitation of chicken IgY in egg yolks. The assay has been developed for educational use to be included in a biotechnology oriented curriculum. It may also find use in quantitation of chicken antibody based products. 

  • Herpes Simplex Type 1 (HSV-1) Antigen Capture ELISA

    Herpes simplex virus is a member of the herpesvirus group which includes Varicella-zoster, cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus. Replication of the virus occurs within the cell nucleus and is complete upon lysis of the cell. Distinguishing the members of the herpesvirus group can be accomplished by antigenic analysis and definition of biologic properties. In recent times, the subdivision of HSV into specific types has become possible.

    It is estimated that at any given time, between 0.65 and 15 percent of all adults may be excreting HSV-1 or HSV-2. Rates of infection appear to be inversely related to socioeconomic status. Only 30-50 percent of adults in higher socioeconomic groups have HSV antibodies while 80-100 percent of the lower socioeconomic groups have specific antibodies.

  • Influenza A NCP ELISA (Photometric)


    Influenza viruses can be divided into three classes, A, B, and C, largely based upon conserved antigenic differences in the internal nucleoprotein. Influenza A virus, typically encountered more frequently than types B and C, and associated with the majority of serious epidemics, can be further subdivided into strains or subtypes based on antigenic differences in the external hemagglutinin proteins (H1-H16) and neuraminidase proteins (N1-N9).

    A variety of wild waterfowl appear to be the predominant natural reservoir for Influenza A viruses and subtypes representing many of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase combinations can be found circulating in these birds. Historically, human influenza virus infections have been associated with H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 subtypes of influenza A, although a recent (1997) and significant outbreak in Hong Kong was identified as an H5N1 subtype.

  • Influenza A Virus NP Antibody Inhibition ELISA


    Influenza viruses can be divided into three classes, A, B, and C, largely based upon conserved antigenic differences in the internal nucleoprotein. Influenza A virus, typically encountered more frequently than types B and C, and associated with the majority of serious epidemics, can be further subdivided into strains or subtypes based on antigenic differences in the external hemagglutinin proteins (H1-H16) and neuraminidase proteins (N1-N9).

    A variety of wild waterfowl appear to be the predominant natural reservoir for Influenza A viruses and subtypes representing most of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase combinations can be found circulating in these birds.

  • Influenza B NCP ELISA (Photometric)

    Influenza viruses can be divided into three classes, A, B, and C, largely based upon conserved antigenic differences in the internal nucleoprotein. Influenza A virus, typically encountered more frequently than types B and C, and associated with the majority of serious epidemics, can be further subdivided into strains or subtypes based on antigenic differences in the external hemagglutinin proteins (H1-H16) and neuraminidase proteins (N1-N9).

    Influenza B virus is predominantly a human pathogen, although it has been found to infect seals. The limited host range of influenza B and a slower rate of mutation than influenza A appears to preclude development of influenza B pandemics, but influenza B is a significant human pathogen and on an individual basis, infection may result in death.

  • Influenza B Nucleoprotein (NP) Antibody Inhibition ELISA

    2017 12 07 1325Influenza viruses can be divided into three classes, A, B, and C, largely based upon conserved antigenic differences in the internal nucleoprotein. Influenza A virus, typically encountered more frequently than types B and C, and associated with the majority of serious epidemics, can be further subdivided into strains or subtypes based on antigenic differences in the external hemagglutinin proteins (H1-H18) and neuraminidase proteins (N1-N11).

    Historically, human influenza A virus infections have been associated with H1N1, N2N2, and H3N2 subtypes of influenza A, although a 1997 outbreak in Hong Kong was identified as an H5N1 subtype. This outbreak was not only significant because it resulted in multiple human infections and deaths, but it also represented the first known demonstration of avian influenza virus transmission to humans.

  • Rotavirus Antigen Capture ELISA

    Rotaviruses are the main cause of acute gastroenteritis, especially in children under the age of two years. Rotaviruses have been identified in almost 50% of the feces of children with gastroenteritis, responsible for 600,000-800,000 death annually. Rotavirus infections occur frequently during the winter months.

    Gastroenteritis from enteric viruses can be mortal in risk populations such as children, the elderly or immunosuppressed individuals. Characteristic symptoms include vomiting, hydro-diarrhea for between 3 and 8 days, high temperature and stomach pains. Rotaviruses transferred via the fecal-oral route are eliminated in large quantities into the intestine, so that hospital-borne infections from rotaviruses are regarded very seriously, particularly in baby stations and pediatric clinics, and are difficult to control. Early and reliable detection so that rotaviruses can be recognized and further infections avoided is therefore very important.